Sections and Panels

back to Sections & Panels index

Section 8. Relazioni internazionali (International Relations)

Chairs: Marco Clementi, Daniela Sicurelli

Contemporary conflict patterns are challenging conventional knowledge on security. On the one hand, asymmetric conflicts within states and between states clearly show the ever growing relevance of non state actors. In this regard, state sovereignty is under double siege. First, it is eroded by threats that do not have territorial nature such as transnational terrorism, organized crime, environmental threats, and, also, migration flows and human rights violations resulting from regional instability and regional crises. Second, state sovereignty is undermined by the proliferation of failing political institutions in several states; and the privatization of force in many others, including stable and well developed democracies. On the other hand, energy and natural resources are becoming more and more important both in economic and strategic terms, also thanks to the growth of emerging powers. In this respect, growing international competition on static resources seem to renew the political meaning and stakes of territorial control. Moreover, deepening regionalization trends and the revival of nationalism in several areas of the system are increasing the relevance of local and regional dynamics, thereby giving new momentum to territorially bound and/or related factors. All in all, it seems that the study of contemporary international politics could take benefit from focusing on how politics and territory are mutually related; and, on the distinctive features this relationship takes in various regional settings. As a consequence, the section promotes panels for the study of the security dimensions of the changing relationship between politics and territory in various regional settings. The section welcomes both panels devoted to study the specific characteristics of contemporary conflict patterns; and, the specific characteristics of national, regional and global strategies of conflict management. Both theoretical and research panels are welcome.
 

Panel 8.1 The US and the Challenge of Building Global Order from Regional Disorder (I)


The contemporary liberal international order based on the American primacy, post-world war 2 and post Cold war institutions, and liberal principles faces an increasing number of global and region-specific challenges.
Moreover, the increasing relevance of domestic sources of international conflict together with deepening processes of strategic and economic regionalization have much complicated the US global influence, be it in political, military and economic affairs. In turn, the US ability to produce and protect the international order has become more and more difficult.
In such a spatially fragmented international system, one may ask what the US has done in order to defend the national interest and the stability of the international order it created during the Cold War; and, what major challenges it had to manage in this regard. These questions are compelling by themselves but they become even more important in times of possible decline of the country.
This panel is devoted to debate how the US is dealing with the challenge of matching global interests to regional dynamics; and, to ask whether the US is able to produce and sustain order at the system level and within the different regional subsystems.In this regard, papers could help to assess the US ability to produce the international order face two possible alternatives: an increasing disorder both at the global and regional level or the development of a multiplicity of different regional orders.
Both theoretical and empirical papers are welcome. The panel is open to papers following several research strategies. For instance, papers could focus on US global policies and ask if and how they have been differently implemented at the regional level. Papers could also compare US policies in different regional settings. Papers could also focus on the US policies in specific regions and ask if and how they are influenced by challenges and policies that take place in other regions.

Chairs: Pisciotta Barbara, Marco Clementi, Matteo Dian

Discussants: Andrea Carati

Power Concentration, Geography and Socialization: a Neorealist model of Unipolar Stability
Giovanni Barbieri (giovanni.barbieri@unicatt.it)
AbstractThe persistent character of Unipolarity keeps questioning the explanatory power of Neorealist Theories. The absence of balancing behaviors against United States and the general observable patterns of cooperation across the International System both seem to disconfirm the central claim of structural realism, that is States always balance against a preponderant power. At the same time, this specific dynamic seems to come in support of the findings of the Hegemonic Stability theories as well as the Constructivist claims about the role of ideational factors in shaping international political outcomes. In this paper I propose a neorealist structural model, trying to reconcile the above mentioned approaches by modifying two elements of Waltz’ original theory. Insted of relying solely on systemic polarity, the number of Great Powers in the system, I focus on power concentration, that is the relative inequalities between Great Powers, which helps distinguishing between concentrated systems and diffuse systems. Moreover, I classify States between Land Powers and Maritime Powers. While polarity points to the dimension of the international systems by simply “counting” the number of Great Powers, power concentration analysis evaluates the differences in relative capability between them, clarifying the link between structural incentives to action, power and cost-benefit approach. Great Powers’ geographical position effectively affects systemic dynamics, given that the interests of a Maritime Power and the threats which it poses are fundamentally different from the ones of a Land Power, as it is largely outlined by offensive realism. Going further, specific configurations of this kind of system’s structure could foster the emergence of process variables (or intervening variables). The one I focus on is socialization. Waltz’ first treatment of socialization was about the process through which States get socialized to the fundamental rules of the system. In this work, socialization is conceived as the process which inhibits the recurrence of the balancing systemic tendency as a result of a policy of self-restraint enacted by States. In this frame, socialization as an intervening variable is more likely to become manifest in conjunction with high levels of power concentration. From a theoretical point of view, the result is an “enriched” version of Waltz’ structural model, which contributes in redefining the causal link between systemic polarity, States’ behaviors and stability. On the one hand, it looses the mechanicistic character of Waltz’ structural realism by considering balancing one among many optimal policy option. On the other hand, by focusing more closely on the role of power and geography as the prime determinants of States’ behaviors, the model intervenes on the fundamental realist assumption of constant structural incentives to States’ action, assuming that these incentives change as the international structure experiences shiftings in the power concentration level. From an empirical point of view, I apply the model to the current unipolar system, to demonstrate why the absence of balancing, rather than an anomaly, could be considered one among others possible political outcomes, like sustained cooperation fostered by an underlying socialization process.

Spatial fragmentation and US support to the main intergovernmental organizations of the Western order
Carla Monteleone (carla.monteleone01@unipa.it)
AbstractThe coming to reality of projects such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the New Development Bank has redefined institutional roles and power relations in Asia, but it has also revealed a potential spatial fragmentation of the liberal international order promoted by the US with the support of its Western allies at the end of World War II and expanded after the end of the Cold War. It has also exposed limitations in the effectiveness of the reforms adopted by the World Bank and the IMF, and divisions between the US and its main European allies. This happens at a moment in which China becomes more assertive at the UN, in particular in the Security Council, and the US promotes minilateral inter-regional free trade agreements (TPP and TTIP) that might undermine the WTO. While much attention has been paid to the role of rising powers within the main existing intergovernmental organizations of the Western order or to their potential challenge to the existing order, less attention has been paid to the US reaction. In order to understand whether and how the US is trying to preserve the status quo face to the current power shift (both in terms of rising powers and decline of its traditional allies), the paper will assess variations and continuities in US support to the main intergovernmental organizations of the liberal international order. In particular, it will analyze whether the US has maintained its preeminent position and decisiveness in the UN, IMF, WB and WTO, and the reforms that it has been willing to promote or accept to maintain these organizations relevant in the current international order.

Containtment trhough trade? Explaining the US support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership
Arlo Poletti (apoletti@luiss.it)
AbstractThe papers discusses the political-economic factors driving the US government's decision to embark in negotiations for a mega-trade agreement with key Asian partners such as the Trans-Pacific Parnteership (TPP). The main argument advanced in this paper is that this strategy was motivated by concerns about the changing relative balance of economic power and, consequently, by the potential prospects for improving the US' relative economic position in the international economy due to the trade diversion effects of the TPP.

Too Far Ahead? The US Bid for Military Superiority and its Implications for European Allies
Andrea Locatelli (andrea1.locatelli@unicatt.it)
AbstractSince the early 1990s, the US has made an unprecedented effort to keep – and actually increase – the military superiority it had gained during the Cold War. Buzzwords like “Revolution in Military Affairs” and “Defence Transformation” have marked the American defence policy at the turn of the century. To put it bluntly, this commitment was epitomized over the years by constantly high defence budgets, but most importantly by a procurement policy markedly inclined towards innovation and an ongoing effort at doctrinal adaptation. On the other hand, America’s European partners have been mostly reluctant to follow the US example: not only they have kept their budgets to a minimum, but (with just a few exceptions) they have also shown little interest at innovations. As a result, the power asymmetry between the two shores of the Atlantic has grown to the point of endangering the effectiveness of the Transatlantic alliance. The aim of the paper is then threefold: firstly, to illustrate the US defence policy in the past 25 years; secondly, to ponder how NATO has been affected by that; thirdly, to discuss the problems entailed by this state of affairs for the US and its allies altogether.

 

Panel 8.1 The US and the Challenge of Building Global Order from Regional Disorder (II)


The contemporary liberal international order based on the American primacy, post-world war 2 and post Cold war institutions, and liberal principles faces an increasing number of global and region-specific challenges.
Moreover, the increasing relevance of domestic sources of international conflict together with deepening processes of strategic and economic regionalization have much complicated the US global influence, be it in political, military and economic affairs. In turn, the US ability to produce and protect the international order has become more and more difficult.
In such a spatially fragmented international system, one may ask what the US has done in order to defend the national interest and the stability of the international order it created during the Cold War; and, what major challenges it had to manage in this regard. These questions are compelling by themselves but they become even more important in times of possible decline of the country.
This panel is devoted to debate how the US is dealing with the challenge of matching global interests to regional dynamics; and, to ask whether the US is able to produce and sustain order at the system level and within the different regional subsystems.In this regard, papers could help to assess the US ability to produce the international order face two possible alternatives: an increasing disorder both at the global and regional level or the development of a multiplicity of different regional orders.
Both theoretical and empirical papers are welcome. The panel is open to papers following several research strategies. For instance, papers could focus on US global policies and ask if and how they have been differently implemented at the regional level. Papers could also compare US policies in different regional settings. Papers could also focus on the US policies in specific regions and ask if and how they are influenced by challenges and policies that take place in other regions.

Chairs: Pisciotta Barbara, Marco Clementi, Matteo Dian

Discussants: Matteo Dian

The US in the Syrian conflict: recycling the modes of regional domination
Marina Calculli (marcal84@email.gwu.edu)
AbstractThis paper investigates US foreign policy toward Syria since 2011. More specifically, it seeks to critically analyze the policy of disengagement from the Middle East, as announced by President Obama, through the case of the US involvement in the Syrian conflict. By exploring narratives, principles and practices delivered and deployed by both the State Department and the White House, the paper sheds light on the ambiguities and contradictions of disengagement. Whereas 'self-determination of regional actors' has supplanted 'external guidance' in US foreign policy ideology, and the military presence of US forces in active combat , the paper shows how the US is still a major player in orchestrating the regional balance of power, and manipulating the hierarchy of preferences put forward by US old and new allies in the region.

Constructing a Regional Order through Security: Strategies and Failures of U.S. policy towards the Sahara-Sahel region
Edoardo Baldaro (edoardo.baldaro@sns.it)
AbstractIn July 1991, Barry Buzan published on International Affairs the seminal article ‘New Patterns of Global Security in the Twenty-First Century’, where he discussed the evolution of global security after the end of the Cold War. In further work, he defined 1989-1991 as the meta-event which imposed a turning point in the international order, creating the North-South divide [Buzan, Hansen, 2009]. Since then, global peripheries have been perceived as places where the liberal order is at stake, as a consequence of political and institutional instability and because of the new kind of threats that characterize these geopolitical areas. ‘Third World challenged the dominant understanding of security in three important respects: 1. Its focus on the interstate level as the point of origin of security threats. 2. Its exclusion of nonmilitary phenomena from the security studies agenda. 3. Its belief in the global balance of power as the legitimate and effective instrument of international order’ [Acharya, 1997]. The 9/11 strengthened these dynamics: ‘the post 9/11 moment brought more radical changes to the global periphery, as it was used as a pretext to reconfigure it as a space of in/security rather than as spaces of, for example, underdevelopment and poverty’ [Smith, 2009]. Since the beginning of the 1990s Africa appeared as one of the more instable, conflict-prone area of the world. Underdevelopment and institutional fragility fueled violence and attracted attention on African dis-order. The today so-called Sahara-Sahel is an African region composed by fragile or ‘partially sovereign’ states, to wit states where central government has partially lost the control on borders and national territories, and where a ‘sanctuarization’ of the area by terrorist organizations could take place. The Sahara-Sahel came under international spotlights only after the 9/11, becoming one of the “hot-spots” of the Global War on Terror (GWOT). In 2002 the U.S. Administration launched the Pan-Sahel Initiative, subsequently renamed Trans Sahara Counter Terrorism Partnership, making of the Sahel the second African front of the GWOT. Today, in the Sahara-Sahel region, we can generally observe the overlap between new emergencies and more endemic deadlocks: the “terrorist-driven” civil war in Mali – started as a Tuareg rebellion in 2012 – has clear links with the collapse of the Libyan state and it seems to offer new strength to both Aqim - Al Qa’ida in the Islamic Maghreb, the regional branch of the terrorist organization - and other locals terrorists groups such as Ansar Dine and Mojwa. At the same time, the Nigerian Boko Haram endangers the states of the region from the south, and threatens to spread violence and instability in other parts of West Africa. However, Islamist terrorism is not the only menace that can be encountered in the region: drug, arms, cigarettes and human trafficking prosper in a poorly developed and political instable area, creating a multidimensional threat that goes from Mauritania to Lake Chad This paper explores the American security policy in this region as a case study, in order to investigate how the United States defined and managed the threats coming from the ungoverned spaces of the global peripheries. Those spaces, which are considered as a ‘new’ and multidimensional menace, are territories where political, economic and social inequalities and environmental insecurities, all contribute to the creation of a regional security complex [Lake, Morgan, 1997; Buzan, Waever, 2003]. The main research questions this paper aims to answer are Why does the United States consider their interests as endangered in the Sahara-Sahel? How has American policy towards the Sahel been organized? By combining the analysis of the American definition of order and security in unstable regions with the study of the process of securitization of the Sahara-Sahel region, this paper aims to explore how American decision-makers re-defined the concept of security in the area and have planned to answer to those menaces coming from the region itself. We suggest that the U.S. have organized their policy around three main axes, i.e. counterterrorism, de-radicalization and institution-building, all inspired by their interpretation of stability and order in Africa. These strategic beliefs have been fed by previous experiences on peace-building, and they have also been applied in other regional theaters such us the Middle East. Moreover, the paper aims to analyze the local dynamics and insecurities, in order to understand how the American order, based on security institutions, was received by both regional and local actors within the region and why it failed to be implemented.

Commercialization of maritime security: the case of the United States
Eugenio Cusumano (e.cusumano@hum.leidenuniv.nl), Stefano Ruzza (stefano.ruzza@gmail.com)
AbstractSince the early 2000s maritime piracy has become a growing international security concern, especially in the area off the Somali coast (Gulf of Aden and Western Indian Ocean). In the face of this challenge (and especially in relation to the peak of attacks occurred between 2009-11) the major flagging states have reacted with a range of responses that included, in addition to naval military missions (eg. NATO Ocean Shield, active since 2009), the use of armed guards onboard merchant vessels. As the first global provider of security, the United States - although limitedly affected directly from piracy - could not abstain to respond to this issue. This paper focuses on anti-piracy policies adopted by the US, with particular reference to the use of private guards on board (Privately Contracted Armed Security Personnel - PCASP). Specifically, it analyzes the process that led to the opening of the boarding armed personnel and the preference for private staff (rather than military) in the light of the four dominant paradigms in explaining the processes of privatization of security on the ground (functional, ideological, political , bureaucratic), hence considering the limitations of each and integrating their explanatory capabilities.

"Offshore Balancer US- Ready and Equipped to Protect Freedom of Navigation in Times of Territorial and Maritime Desputs in East and Southeast asia?
Axel Berkofsky (Axel_Berkofsky@yahoo.com)
Abstract The paper will analyse whether or whether the U.S. is ready and prepared to get involved in Asian territorial and maritime disputes in order to defend freedom of navigation for itself and other interested parties, In particular, the paper will seek to analyse until what extent Washington is politically and militarily prepared to confront Chinese policies related to territorial claims in East and Southeast Asia, jeopardising freedom of navigation in the region.

 

Panel 8.2 Collective violence in intra-state conflicts. From historical cases to ISIS


After the end of the Cold War, intra-state conflicts attracted increasing attention both from policy-makers and scholars, due to their overall numbers, lethality, and for their consequences on regional, and sometimes global, orders. The growing literature on civil wars, and more broadly on collective violence (including terrorism and large-scale violence perpetrated by “criminal” groups such as drug trafficking organizations), provided in the last two decades important insights on the causes, the dynamics – and increasingly in recent years – on the social, economic and political consequences of conflicts. This panel will focus on violence in intra-state conflicts (as well as “transnational civil wars”). In order to do so, it welcomes both theoretical and empirical contributions, ideally gathering proposals that adopt diverse research strategies and research methods, and look at different levels of analysis. The topics include, although they are not limited to, the following:
a) studies on the relation between the evolution of the international system and the proliferation of domestic conflict;
b) papers on the “micro”-level dynamics of violence, such as the strategic use of violence (selective and discriminate) by armed groups;
c) research on spatial and temporal variation of political conflict and violence;
d) studies on the organizational set-up of insurgent organizations, terrorist groups, armed militias;
e) papers on “wartime political orders” and “rebel governance”;
f) insurgent groups’ decision to use terrorist tactics both in civil wars and abroad.

Chairs: Stefano Costalli, Francesco Moro

Terrorists going Transnational: Rethinking the Role of States
Silvia D'Amato (silvia.damato@sns.it)
AbstractBy focusing on two African Islamist terrorist groups, AQIM and Boko Haram, this paper offers a new light on the determinants of terrorist groups’ geographical strategies. Why do these groups decide to go ‘’transnational' despite their strong domestic roots? Is 'transnationality' really a strategy or does it stem from a contextual necessity? Indeed, the spatial dimension plays a key role in terrorist strategies. This means that it is crucial to investigate the choice by these groups to position themselves in relation to the circumstantial geographical space. In particular, this paper moves beyond theories emphasizing state failure as the cause for terrorist 'spill-over'. Costs and risks of transnational activities are presented as factors that highlight how the possibility to cross borders and states loss of monopoly on violence are limited in explaining why groups decide to relocate in neighboring countries. Hence, this paper proposes an interpretation of these decisions as mainly constituted by states' counterterrorism strategies, being those national or third-party state actions.

Modelli di analisi per le attuali situazioni di crisi nell’area mediterranea. Incidenza dell’ISIS nelle dinamiche della stabilizzazione.
Fabio Atzeni (fabatzeni@gmail.com)
AbstractModelli di analisi per le attuali situazioni di crisi nell’area mediterranea. Incidenza dell’ISIS nelle dinamiche della stabilizzazione. Lineamenti Le recenti e complesse dinamiche in un ampio arco di crisi –dalla Tunisia alla Siria (con la propaggine irachena)- interessate dal fenomeno ISIS, possono essere analizzate con un modello interpretativo di valore generale. È proposto un approccio metodologico, ancorché empirico, per individuare le cause dei mutamenti e le linee evolutive degli eventi in corso. Si consolida la visione dell’origine delle crisi all’interno degli Stati, tuttavia, l’impatto di queste crisi è ben più ampio e mette in gioco interessi e politiche di molti attori interni ed esterni e il ruolo delle Organizzazioni Internazionali. Il modello, pur se provvisorio e parziale, deve soddisfare l’esigenza di dinamicità per descrivere il rapido sviluppo degli eventi e la molteplicità dei protagonisti che tendono a obiettivi tra loro diversi. Da tempo, i canoni originali del Crisis Management sono stati superati per la notevole frammentazione delle entità statuali in molteplici fazioni e localismi. Tutto ciò ha aperto la strada a una microconflittualità, spesso trans-frontaliera (come nel caso dell’ISIS), ampia e diffusa nei territori. Pertanto, gli spazi temporali relativi a momenti cruciali quali l’escalation e la de-escalation, si modificano sensibilmente, rapportandosi ai gruppi e ai protagonisti in gioco. Tali elementi, amplificati dalla diffusione mediatica, incidono fortemente sugli atteggiamenti e sull’intensità della violenza delle parti coinvolte. L’ingresso dei nuovi mezzi di comunicazione del web ha drammatizzato ulteriormente gli eventi attraverso il fenomeno noto come “tirannia dell’immagine”, condizionando l’orientamento della pubblica opinione. Metodologia Ai fini della costruzione metodologica sono stati rivisitati alcuni casi storici consolidati e di riferimento per l’analisi dell’interazione tra gruppi e fazioni rivali, e del reale svolgimento delle crisi. Inoltre, i casi più recenti hanno aggiunto la novità della presenza di formazioni terroristiche internazionali (Al Qaeda, ISIS…), oltre a un numero sempre maggiore di attori protagonisti e di loro sostenitori (entità statuali e/o privati cittadini), ampliando la griglia delle azioni-reazioni tra i gruppi in lotta, accrescendo così la complessità della gestione delle crisi. Tali elementi comportano l’adozione di un modello a n. interlocutori rispetto alle situazioni storiche che sono rappresentabili, perlopiù, da modelli a due interlocutori. Il modello a n. interlocutori consente, invece, di seguire in “continuo” l’andamento delle fasi delle crisi. Nel dettaglio si avranno: a. fase politico/diplomatica (il negoziato è lo strumento tipico); b. fase pre-crisi (inizio delle violenze e delle prime sommosse – si tende a rifiutare qualsiasi compromesso politico); c. uso potenziale della forza (lo strumento utilizzato è la pressione militare sugli avversari per ottenere le condizioni migliori nelle trattative); d. scontro armato (nel quale si cerca di neutralizzare le fazioni avversarie); e. fase post-crisi (il negoziato ufficiale o spesso segreto torna a essere uno strumento politico o diplomatico). Nella descrizione è importante tenere presente che nella stessa realtà statuale possono coesistere fasi diverse inerenti a taluno dei molti attori in gioco e alla loro distribuzione sul territorio (caso libico). Per semplificare il modello a più interlocutori, pur accettando talune approssimazioni, è possibile effettuare delle aggregazioni tra i vari attori della crisi, raggruppandoli per comunanza di obiettivi politici o degli interessi sul campo. Per tali ragioni, la molteplicità degli attori della crisi risulta essere sempre il problema cruciale. A tal fine, per rimanere ancorati il più possibile alla realtà, pur cercando di astrarre un modello utile al ragionamento, si è analizzato e studiato in modo comparato il caso siriano e quello libico, che rappresentano i più recenti modelli a n. interlocutori. In particolare, le posizioni dei due blocchi, Siria e Libia, ambedue condizionati dalla pressione dell’ISIS, illuminano fasi temporali diverse e diversi stadi conflittuali. Entrambi consentono di esaminare parallelamente momenti di trattative e momenti di scontro. Di notevole interesse il caso siriano, che presenta sulla curva tempo (t) e intensità (i), fasi contemporanee di negoziato (i colloqui di Ginevra) e di parziale cessate il fuoco. Inoltre, sulla curva si registrano i molteplici combattimenti condotti dall’ISIS, dalle altre formazioni terroristiche e dalle altre numerose milizie nell’area Iraq-Siria, oltre agli innumerevoli attentati. Il caso libico offre spunti d’interesse per evidenziare l’opera di mediazione della Comunità Internazionale in una realtà sfaccettata, composta da una galassia di milizie armate, ove il ricorso alla forza, ancorché a livello locale e l’inquietante presenza dell’ISIS nella Sirte, condizionano la lineare gestione della crisi. Pertanto, entrambi i casi hanno elementi in comune e descrivono i punti focali degli sconvolgimenti oggi in corso nel Bacino del Mediterraneo. Elementi concettuali Particolare significato assume la potenzialità del modello a n. interlocutori di suggerire l’adozione, nelle diverse fasi della crisi, di un approccio flessibile e differenziato, ossia di una strategia politico-militare onnicomprensiva, idonea a ravvicinare le posizioni più distanti. Nello stesso tempo, si deve mettere in evidenza la possibile contraddizione allorché si assumano atteggiamenti diversi, in situazioni simili e quindi il rischio di perdere la credibilità verso i rispettivi interlocutori. Tale rischio aumenta qualora si debba far ricorso allo strumento militare. Il modello può agevolare ma non risolvere automaticamente le difficoltà interpretative delle reali intenzioni altrui, soprattutto nelle fasi di b. pre-crisi e c. uso potenziale della forza. Tuttavia, esso consente di comprendere il rischio delle scelte, pur nella difficoltà di valutare gli effetti delle proprie iniziative politiche, soprattutto quando la scelta dell’uso della forza potrebbe cadere in un momento sfavorevole, impedendo qualsiasi spiraglio di trattativa. In definitiva, il modello a più interlocutori, consente di comprendere meglio il momentum della crisi e di conseguenza, quali siano i migliori comportamenti da tenere e gli strumenti più idonei da utilizzare nelle varie fasi, tenendo sempre presente che l’obiettivo primario da raggiungere, a breve termine, coincide con la cessazione almeno momentanea delle ostilità e quindi con un cessate il fuoco. Pertanto, si può affermare che tale schema migliori su più fronti la capacità interpretativa fornendo un maggior numero di elementi di analisi rispetto agli schemi utilizzati in precedenza nello studio delle crisi. Nota: per lo sviluppo dello studio, l’autore si è avvalso della consulenza del Prof. Carlo Bellinzona

The radicalisation pathways and mobilisation dynamics of jihadist foreign fighters: The case of Italy
Francesco Marone (francesco.marone@unipv.it)
AbstractOver the last few years the authorities in a number of countries have expressed strong concerns about the thousands of citizens and residents joining the ranks of jihadist armed groups in Syria and Iraq. As is well-known, the danger of so-called jihadist “foreign fighters” is high on the agenda. This explorative paper examines the current extent of Italy’s Sunni jihadist foreign fighters in Syria. Italy presents interesting particularities, including a relatively small number of foreign fighters compared to other European countries (according to recent estimates, around one hundred, and only a few tens with Italian passports). However, the Italian case has not been extensively investigated. The paper, based on a case study-driven approach, first examines the scale of the problem and then focuses on the profiles, motivations and radicalisation pathways of a selected number of Italian nationals who left for Syria and Iraq, at the micro level. Moreover, on the basis of currently available information, it explores the foreign fighter mobilisation process in the Italian case.

Wearing a Keffiyeh in Rome: The Transnational Relationships Between the Italian Revolutionary Left and the Palestinian Resistance
Luca Falciola (luca.falciola@unicatt.it)
AbstractThis paper analyzes how transnational relationships between violent groups affect the dynamics of intra-state conflict and violence. The research explores the transnational connections between the Italian revolutionary left and the Palestinian resistance, during the period 1967–1982. Based on historical primary sources and a set of original interviews with protagonists, the article deals with four main questions. First, it focuses on the political reception of the Palestinian cause within the Italian revolutionary left and assesses its crucial relevance. Second, the paper examines how Palestinian militancy established roots in Italy and the way through which the national and international context facilitated it. Third, the research investigates the interaction between Italian revolutionary leftists and Palestinian militants both in Italy and in the Middle-East. Fourth, the paper scrutinizes, on one hand, the factors that have strengthened the transnational relationship, contributing to the radicalization of the revolutionary leftists; on the other hand, it surveys the factors that have inhibited a total approach, by preventing the establishment of structured coalitions and a broad transfer of repertoires of actions. Overall, the paper argues that such connections were more sought after than extensively practiced. As a consequence, they may have fostered cognitive radicalization, but did not necessarily translate into the use of more violence.

 

Panel 8.3 Intelligence e regimi politici democratici e autoritari


L'intelligence è un'attività che, da sempre, mira a difendere l'interesse nazionale di un Paese. Ma cos'è l'interesse nazionale? Come evolve questo concetto a seconda del regime politico che caratterizza un determinato Stato? Il tipo di regime politico, per certo, influirà sia sulla concezione del termine “interesse nazionale” che sulla messa in atto di provvedimenti per difenderlo, nonché sui mezzi impiegati, in primis quelli legati alle attività di intelligence e di comunicazione. In un mondo in continua trasformazione, sempre più “glocal” e liquido, come direbbero Mc Luhan e Baumann, nuove tecnologie (in particolare la ICT) prendono il sopravvento ed il mondo virtuale e quello reale fisico si fondono a creare uno scenario nuovo e ricco di sorprese. Come cambia l'intelligence alla luce di queste trasformazioni? Tutte le attività si sposteranno verso la quinta dimensione, oppure assisteremo all'avvento della cosiddetta “Revenge of Geography” così come decritta da Robert D. Kaplan in tempi non sospetti?
I servizi di informazione sono, infatti, appannaggio del decisore politico. Tale decisore lavora, salvo casi eccezionali legati a contesti di minaccia asimmetrica, all'interno dello Stato, caratterizzato dalla classica tricotomia territorio-popolazione-legge. In breve, l'intelligence diviene strumento politico del decisore e, nei regimi democratici (in particolare quelli liberali), molto spesso sembra materializzarsi una dicotomia tra i servizi di intelligence (controllo e spionaggio) e i diritti alla libertà (da e nello Stato). Una dicotomia basata, in prima analisi, sul perenne conflitto tra sicurezza e libertà. Per arginare la tirannia del "leviatano", i regimi politici democratici hanno, nel tempo, posto dei meccanismi di "controllo" alle attività condotte dai servizi di intelligence (siano esse azioni condotte nei confini nazionali così come quelle condotte all'estero).
Il punto di equilibrio tra libertà e sicurezza, così come tra intelligence e regimi democratici, sembra averlo trovato Karl Popper il quale, pensando proprio al dilemma che lega i regimi democratici alle attività di intelligence, sosteneva che "il prezzo della libertà è l'eterna vigilanza". Alcuni regimi democratici, come l'Italia e gli Stati Uniti, cercano di far fronte a questo prezzo attraverso l'ossimoro del rendere “trasparente” l'intelligence, con un'azione che si contrappone decisamente a quanto avviene nei regimi autoritari, dove la censura e la delazione anonima sono parole-chiave direttamente collegate al concetto di segreto di Stato, che non rappresenta la semplice tutela di informazioni confidenziali, bensì un vero e proprio strumento per mantenere il monopolio e controllo esclusivo del potere. Tutto questo, ancora una volta, influisce sulla sfera della comunicazione, in uno scenario caratterizzato da sound-bites e comunicazioni-lampo che, pur brevi, hanno un forte effetto di sensibilizzazione e di agenda-setting globale.
Dove stiamo, dunque, andando? questo sistema tendenzialmente multipolare/apolare ci porterà verso il cosiddetto unit veto system? se sì, quale sorte per democrazie e autoritarismi? Quale sarà il ruolo dell'intelligence del futuro? In particolare, cosa ci riveleranno la human intelligence e la human virtual intelligence?
Il Panel, diretta continuazione del lavoro già svolto a partire dal 2013, cercherà di approfondire le dinamiche che soggiaciono alle attività e al ruolo ricoperto dai servizi di intelligence nei regimi politici democratici ed autoritari. I paper givers dovranno affrontare il ruolo dei servizi di intelligence in tali regimi: un ruolo istituzionale, operativo e anche di apparato della pubblica amministrazione. In particolare, la call for papers è rivolta a studiosi e "addetti ai lavori" che, attraverso studi rigorosi e caratterizzati da un comprovato approccio scientifico, analizzino l'evoluzione e l'attuale lavoro svolto dai servizi di intelligence nei diversi contesti. Allo stesso tempo, le ricerche potranno prendere in considerazione anche l'evoluzione tecnologica e l'utilizzo degli strumenti cyber così come porre l'accento sul conflitto (reale o apparente) tra privacy e sicurezza nazionale. I contributi potranno avere carattere specialistico, ad esempio presentando case studies, oppure globale e comparatistico.

Chairs: Umberto Gori

How to armor the sheep while they hunt for wolves
Alessandro Fasani (alessandro.fasani@unicatt.it)
AbstractCritical infrastructures are the backbone of modern society: they manage security, health and wealth of entire nations. Modern critical infrastructures possess the characteristic of being connected to cyberspace, which includes the internet, therefore they are vulnerable to cyber threats. Furthermore, modern critical infrastructures have also the peculiarity of being interconnected one with the other, thus creating a network of infrastructures that can overcome national borders. It is pretty clear, therefore, that such a pivotal element must be secured. Most critical infrastructures are run by private entities but nonetheless, given the scope of the possible consequences on societies that would follow a serious cyber attack, the government is called to help and foster their protection. With a feeble public-private partnership - or the lack of it - the security of a critical infrastructure remains in the hands of those who run it. This paper will analyze how the internal cyber security of a critical infrastructure is to be managed - for example what the risks and implication are which stem from misuse and lack of security culture and awareness - and what measures could be put in place in order to better the critical infrastructure’s defense and resilience against both internal and external cyber threats.

Intelligence e regimi politici, democratici e autoritari
Antonio Guido Monno (guido.monno@gmail.com)
AbstractCome rilevato dal Professor Umberto Gori, nella sua prefazione al libro Intelligence e Interesse Nazionale, uno dei compiti prioritari di una struttura che si dedichi all’Intelligence è quella di concorrere alla difesa degli interessi Nazionali, sia che essi vengano intesi come immutabili e valutabili oggettivamente sia che essi siano mutevoli in relazione agli interessi dei governanti di un paese in un determinato momento storico. Possono considerarsi tali interessi, al di là delle giustificazioni etiche o morali, gli stessi per qualsiasi tipo di regime politico? E in cosa si differenziano essenzialmente le politiche di intelligence dei regimi democratici e di quelli autoritari? Sono sempre valide le parole “They may be bastards, but they are our bastards", attribuite nel tempo a numerosi presidenti e diplomatici statunitensi e di altre potenze, per stigmatizzare che spesso la difesa degli interessi nazionali va al di là dei normali canoni di gestione del potere politico anche nei regimi democratici, e che i limiti che dovrebbero contraddistinguere un regime democratico vengano spesso spostati? E fin dove possono arrivare tali limiti? Fin dove una struttura di Intelligence può e deve spingersi, in un mondo caratterizzato da minacce diverse e spesso non previste nella loro virulenza e complessità, laddove da più parti sono numerosi gli studiosi che parlano delle fonti aperte come elemento prioritario e previlegiato nella raccolta di informazioni?

Regimi politici ed uso dell’intelligence
Umberto Gori (gori_u@unifi.it)
AbstractL'intelligence è un'attività che, da sempre, mira a difendere l'interesse nazionale di un Paese. Ma cos'è l'interesse nazionale? Come evolve questo concetto a seconda del regime politico che caratterizza un determinato Stato? Il tipo di regime politico, per certo, influirà sia sulla concezione del termine “interesse nazionale” che sulla messa in atto di provvedimenti per difenderlo, nonché sui mezzi impiegati, in primis quelli legati alle attività di intelligence e di comunicazione. In un mondo in continua trasformazione, sempre più “glocal” e liquido, come direbbero Mc Luhan e Baumann, nuove tecnologie (in particolare la ICT) prendono il sopravvento ed il mondo virtuale e quello reale fisico si fondono a creare uno scenario nuovo e ricco di sorprese. Come cambia l'intelligence alla luce di queste trasformazioni? Tutte le attività si sposteranno verso la quinta dimensione, oppure assisteremo all'avvento della cosiddetta “Revenge of Geography” così come decritta da Robert D. Kaplan in tempi non sospetti? I servizi di informazione sono, infatti, appannaggio del decisore politico. Tale decisore lavora, salvo casi eccezionali legati a contesti di minaccia asimmetrica, all'interno dello Stato, caratterizzato dalla classica tricotomia territorio-popolazione-legge. In breve, l'intelligence diviene strumento politico del decisore e, nei regimi democratici (in particolare quelli liberali), molto spesso sembra materializzarsi una dicotomia tra i servizi di intelligence (controllo e spionaggio) e i diritti alla libertà (da e nello Stato). Una dicotomia basata, in prima analisi, sul perenne conflitto tra sicurezza e libertà. Per arginare la tirannia del "leviatano", i regimi politici democratici hanno, nel tempo, posto dei meccanismi di "controllo" alle attività condotte dai servizi di intelligence (siano esse azioni condotte nei confini nazionali così come quelle condotte all'estero). Il punto di equilibrio tra libertà e sicurezza, così come tra intelligence e regimi democratici, sembra averlo trovato Karl Popper il quale, pensando proprio al dilemma che lega i regimi democratici alle attività di intelligence, sosteneva che "il prezzo della libertà è l'eterna vigilanza". Alcuni regimi democratici, come l'Italia e gli Stati Uniti, cercano di far fronte a questo prezzo attraverso l'ossimoro del rendere “trasparente” l'intelligence, con un'azione che si contrappone decisamente a quanto avviene nei regimi autoritari, dove la censura e la delazione anonima sono parole-chiave direttamente collegate al concetto di segreto di Stato, che non rappresenta la semplice tutela di informazioni confidenziali, bensì un vero e proprio strumento per mantenere il monopolio e controllo esclusivo del potere. Tutto questo, ancora una volta, influisce sulla sfera della comunicazione, in uno scenario caratterizzato da sound-bites e comunicazioni-lampo che, pur brevi, hanno un forte effetto di sensibilizzazione e di agenda-setting globale. Dove stiamo, dunque, andando? questo sistema tendenzialmente multipolare/apolare ci porterà verso il cosiddetto unit veto system? se sì, quale sorte per democrazie e autoritarismi? Quale sarà il ruolo dell'intelligence del futuro? In particolare, cosa ci riveleranno la human intelligence e la human virtual intelligence? Il Panel, diretta continuazione del lavoro già svolto a partire dal 2013, cercherà di approfondire le dinamiche che soggiaciono alle attività e al ruolo ricoperto dai servizi di intelligence nei regimi politici democratici ed autoritari. I paper givers dovranno affrontare il ruolo dei servizi di intelligence in tali regimi: un ruolo istituzionale, operativo e anche di apparato della pubblica amministrazione. In particolare, la call for papers è rivolta a studiosi e "addetti ai lavori" che, attraverso studi rigorosi e caratterizzati da un comprovato approccio scientifico, analizzino l'evoluzione e l'attuale lavoro svolto dai servizi di intelligence nei diversi contesti. Allo stesso tempo, le ricerche potranno prendere in considerazione anche l'evoluzione tecnologica e l'utilizzo degli strumenti cyber così come porre l'accento sul conflitto (reale o apparente) tra privacy e sicurezza nazionale. I contributi potranno avere carattere specialistico, ad esempio presentando case studies, oppure globale e comparatistico.

Intelligence e natura della minaccia: dal terrorismo convenzionale al Nuovo Terrorismo Insurrezionale di ISIS&Co. attraverso le fasi di marketing, premium branding e franchising
Claudio Bertolotti (claudio.bertolotti@outlook.it)
AbstractGli attentati di Parigi e quelli di Bruxelles degli ultimi due anni hanno confermato una capacità operativa e di coordinamento molto efficiente da parte del cosiddetto "fenomeno dello Stato islamico". La tecnica del commando suicida e la diffusione capillare delle cellule IS ha evidenziato un'evoluzione del terrorismo di marca jihadista: un terrorismo in franchising che influenza sempre più le dinamiche globali. Nonostante siano sviluppi sotto gli occhi di tutti, manca una definizione condivisa e universale di un nuovo modello di terrorismo e delle sue caratteristiche, anche perché molte variabili dipendono del contesto e dalle diverse conflittualità che ne sono alla base. A questo proposito la mutabilità della minaccia jihadista si propone un nuovo approccio metodologico finalizzato alla definizione, lettura, e analisi del fenomeno stesso a partire dalla natura di un terrorismo dinamico e multidimensionale, di cui vanno comprese a pieno le diverse sfumature e peculiarità glo-cali per poter mettere in atto risposte concrete ed efficaci. Questo paper si pone l'obiettivo di definire, in primo luogo, la natura evolutiva del fenomeno stesso attraverso una categorizzazione dei fattori che lo contraddistinguono e di descrivere, in secondo luogo, lo sviluppo delle fasi che lo hanno prtato ad imporsi come minaccia contemporanea: marketing, premium branding, franchising.

 

Panel 8.4 The quest for a new EU Global Strategy: Between theory and practice (I)


The EU is currently developing a new Global Strategy for foreign and security policy, whose publication is expected in June 2016. The revision has been embedded in an elaborate consultation process with different stakeholders across the member states and EU institutions. As such, the consultation process itself is an institution-building exercise for the relatively young European External Action Service. It also comes at an extraordinarily challenging time for the EU when the internal fissures and external pressures are putting to test the whole European project.
The Consultation paper “The New European Neighbourhood Policy” presented in November 2015 can be read as an indication of a number of crucial issues and dilemmas the EU is trying to address. These include the need to rethink the meaning and substance of (strategic) partnerships, the question of how to make conditionality effective, an attempt to update the external governance model, efforts at reconciling the EU’s modus operandi with what some label “the resurgence of geopolitics” in Europe’s neighbourhood, and the ever-present dilemma of reconciling norms and interests, to name just a few key themes. It also comes at a time when global politics itself is changing and new challenges are on the rise.
The panel will discuss the main features of the ongoing consultative process, taking into consideration, in addition to and beyond the concrete review efforts, the broader theoretical questions about the EU’s actor-ness in the field of international relations. It hopes to bridge broader theoretical debates with concrete policy solutions as well as to offer an analysis of the new Global Strategy, emphasizing thus the link between theory and practice, research and policy-making.
The panel seeks to answer the following broad questions: How can we conceive of the EU actor-ness in the current international system? What are the foundations of the “normative power” today? Whether and how can the EU elaborate a common geostrategy and what would that mean in practice? How does the tension between integration and member states’ sovereignty impact the EU’s global action? What are the main innovations in the new Global Strategy?
The panel invites theoretical papers on the foundations of the EU foreign policy as well as empirical research into how the EU implements its policies on the ground.
Discussant: Nathalie Tocci, Deputy Director,

Chairs: Elisa Piras, Kateryna Pishchikova

Discussants: Nathalie Tocci

Modes of external action governance in Eastern Europe: EU normative power to the test of geopolitics
Enrico Fassi (enrico.fassi@unicatt.it), Antonio Zotti (antonio.zotti@unicatt.it)
AbstractOver the last few years, Eastern Europe – with all the significant ambiguities this geographical identification implies – has been the locus of a significant practical and conceptual tension between two modes of the EU external action: the strategic partnership (with Russia) and the neighbourhood policy (directed at former soviet-countries). The frictions between the bi- and the multi-lateral dimension, as well as the flaws inherent in each mode of governance, have been addressed extensively. Nevertheless, the idea of normative power – apparently so amiss in an era of alleged ‘assertive powers’ – appears worth of some analytical consideration, especially within the context of the predicament of the EU foreign policy’s ‘near East vector’. Whereas the regional instability indicates the lack of effectiveness of the European external action, it also exposes the actual level of mutual interdependence established in the area – through both institutional structures and more informal networks – as well as the emergence of specific practices – and the underlying shared meanings – developed through the interaction between the EU’s, the member states’ and partner countries’ officials. Accordingly, the aim of this paper is to attempt a review of the confident version of the concept of ‘normativity’ in light of the current regional predicament in order to test whether and to what extent it proves analytically useful in identifying a specific role and modus operandi of the EU in this international context.

Good news from the EU Global Strategy? A lexicon to cope with swift transformations, from theory to practise.
Daniela Fisichella (fisidan@unict.it)
AbstractAbstract in the file uploaded

Nuanced realism or discouloured liberalism? EU attitudes toward Democracy Promotion (1992-2016)
Elisa Piras (elisa.piras2@unibo.it)
AbstractRecently, the European Union’s ‘model’ of democracy promotion has attracted the attention of several scholars, who have traced its development in the Union’s foreign policy doctrine and have highlighted strengths and shortfalls of EU policies aimed at influencing regime transitions (Freyburg et al. 2015; Kurki 2015; Risse and Babayan 2015; Scmidt 2015; Smith 2015; Wetzel and Orbie 2015). Curiously enough, at the same time the EU’s discourse about democracy promotion appears to be fainter than ever. The key document presented by High Representative Federica Mogherini in 2015 as the starting point for the development of a new global strategy for the Union, The European Union in a changing global environment. A more connected, contested and complex world, never mentions democracy promotion among the priorities of EU foreign policy nor among the instruments for achieving other strategic goals – e.g. regional stability, security, enhanced cooperation with strategic partners. For instance, with respect to the challenges that the EU needs to face in the neighbourhood, the document stresses the need for ‘robust policies to (…) bolster statehood’, leaving aside any (normative) qualification of the neighbours’ regimes. After the end of the Cold War, the EU has traditionally included democracy promotion in its foreign policy discourse and it has created specific financial instruments for supporting democratization policies in developing countries and particularly in post-conflict situations. The 2003 European Security Strategy mentioned the promotion of democracy – or ‘good government’ – as a way to achieve stability at the borders. Is the EU’s silence on democracy promotion a signal of the end of normative power? Is the Union abandoning its normative/ideational peculiarity to adopt a realist worldview and propose itself as a ‘normal’ power? Which are the practical implications of this shift? The paper traces the rise and fall of democracy promotion in the Union’s foreign policy doctrine, analyzing the main strategic documents issued in the period 1992-2016; simultaneously, it investigates the development of democracy promotion policies, describing the main instruments and programmes deployed during the same period.

Values and Interests: What Lies Ahead for the European Union?
Gergana Tzvetkova (g.tzvetkova@sssup.it)
Abstract The proposed paper develops against the background of the vigorous discussions about what constitutes 'normative' when it comes to the common foreign policy of the European Union (EU). Unquestionably, the concept of normative power Europe has been one of the most enduring visualizations of the EU in the past decade. Now, it is put back to the forefront and re-explored, as we await the announcement of the EU Global Strategy on Foreign and Security Policy. Additionally, this paper draws insight from analyses suggesting that the dichotomy between interests and norms/values is an oversimplified one that ultimately obstructs attempt to bring these two together – in both policy-making and policy-analysis. Agreeing with that proposition, here we try to answer the following question: How can we reconcile interests and values? What philosophical link could be established between them? And how can we translate this connection to the way foreign policy is elaborated and perceived? We suggest that an answer to these questions could be sought in the intersection of constructivism as an approach to international relations and pragmatic idealism as a philosophical tradition. The latter has been increasingly discussed by policy-makers and policy-analysts as a potentially beneficial driving principle of the new EU Global Strategy. In the paper, we outline these discussion and present pragmatic idealism’s main philosophical underpinnings regarding the connection between interests and values. As to constructivism, its commitment to the analysis of ideational factors for the construction of interests is well-known and offers numerous useful perceptions. In the second part, we look specifically at human rights, consistently and firmly proclaimed as a core value of the European Union, and a significant component of the image it has been projecting internally and externally. The unraveling of the dichotomy “interests-values” in several specific cases is discussed to illustrate the main points made in the first part of the paper. This paper stems from my PhD research that examines the presence of the concept of human rights in the development and implementation of foreign policy of the United States of America and the European Union, with a specific focus on their counter-piracy efforts in Somalia.

 

Panel 8.4 The quest for a new EU Global Strategy: Between theory and practice (II)


The EU is currently developing a new Global Strategy for foreign and security policy, whose publication is expected in June 2016. The revision has been embedded in an elaborate consultation process with different stakeholders across the member states and EU institutions. As such, the consultation process itself is an institution-building exercise for the relatively young European External Action Service. It also comes at an extraordinarily challenging time for the EU when the internal fissures and external pressures are putting to test the whole European project.
The Consultation paper “The New European Neighbourhood Policy” presented in November 2015 can be read as an indication of a number of crucial issues and dilemmas the EU is trying to address. These include the need to rethink the meaning and substance of (strategic) partnerships, the question of how to make conditionality effective, an attempt to update the external governance model, efforts at reconciling the EU’s modus operandi with what some label “the resurgence of geopolitics” in Europe’s neighbourhood, and the ever-present dilemma of reconciling norms and interests, to name just a few key themes. It also comes at a time when global politics itself is changing and new challenges are on the rise.
The panel will discuss the main features of the ongoing consultative process, taking into consideration, in addition to and beyond the concrete review efforts, the broader theoretical questions about the EU’s actor-ness in the field of international relations. It hopes to bridge broader theoretical debates with concrete policy solutions as well as to offer an analysis of the new Global Strategy, emphasizing thus the link between theory and practice, research and policy-making.
The panel seeks to answer the following broad questions: How can we conceive of the EU actor-ness in the current international system? What are the foundations of the “normative power” today? Whether and how can the EU elaborate a common geostrategy and what would that mean in practice? How does the tension between integration and member states’ sovereignty impact the EU’s global action? What are the main innovations in the new Global Strategy?
The panel invites theoretical papers on the foundations of the EU foreign policy as well as empirical research into how the EU implements its policies on the ground.
Discussant: Nathalie Tocci, Deputy Director,

Chairs: Elisa Piras, Kateryna Pishchikova

Discussants: Nathalie Tocci

The High Representative's dilemmas: assessing Catherine Ashton's role in Egypt during the Arab Spring
maria giulia amadio viceré (mamadio@luiss.it), sergio fabbrini (sfabbrini@luiss.it)
AbstractThe 2009 Lisbon Treaty has institutionalized a dual constitution or decision-making regime: supranational for the policies of the single market and intergovernmental for the policies traditionally at the core of national sovereignty, such as foreign and defense policies. Indeed, the innovations of the EU foreign policy-making structure were considered strategic features of the new legal provisions. Yet, in one of the most significant test for the EU foreign and defense policies in the post-Lisbon era, namely the Egyptian political transition, the intergovernmental approach generated unsatisfactory outcomes. Since the mandate of the first post-Lisbon Treaty High Representative, Catherine Ashton, largely coincides with the crisis of the political regime in the Northern African country between 2011 and 2014, the paper investigates the High Representative’s role in this policy dossier during her tenure.

How to promote integration in the last bastion of sovereignty? The case of the European Defence Agency
Antonio Calcara (acalcara@luiss.it)
AbstractTitle: How to promote integration in the last bastion of sovereignty? The case of the European Defence Agency Author: Antonio Calcara (Ph.D. Student- Department of Political Science- LUISS “Guido Carli-Rome) Abstract In a fragmented and violent international system and in the context of economic austerity and decreasing defense budgets, there is an important debate, at the political and academic level, on the urgency for a greater defense in Europe. While President Juncker has declared defense as a priority , reiterating the long term vision of a "European Army" and the High Representative Federica Mogherini is coordinating a new EU "Global Strategy", on the other hand we are witnessing a growing "renationalisation" of defense policies of the EU member states (Kehoane 2016). Even if, on the one hand lots of scholars in European studies have focused on the role and characteristics of the CSDP, on the other hand not much has been done in the academic domain about the rising political order of defence cooperation in the EU. In the evolving EU defence field, the European Defence Agency (EDA) - despite its limited budget and formal competences – is pushing for a progressive “Europeanization” of the defence field through pooling and sharing of resources, liberalization of the defence market, Europeanization of military standards and support to dual-use civilian-military research. The role of the EDA has been underestimated in European studies and International Relations literature, focusing only on its formal and legalistic aspects (Dyson and Konstadinides 2013; Trybus 2006;2014), on the agency's institutionalization (Bátora 2009; Ekelund 2015) or on EDA's norms (Cross 2015). There are no systematical analysis that aims to assess the role of the EDA in the EU defence field and its peculiar relationship with EU member states. My argument is that the EDA has been able to combine a top-down (based on EU strategic capabilities shortfalls) with a bottom-up approach (close, regular dialogue with national counterparts and non-governmental actors), thanks to an “hybrid” way of working that includes "national" (capital-based member states), "European" (EDA's staff) and non-governmental experts on activities on a very technical level. The EDA is becoming de facto the hub of an emerging transgovernmental network of European defence experts and professionals and it is gaining legitimacy “vìs a vìs” member states and the European Commission (EC). In the complex landscape in which the EU Global Strategy is situated, this study is necessary to assess the role of the EDA after more than ten years since its establishment and to analyse how defence cooperation works in practice, paying more attention to bottom-up processes within institutions at the EU level.

'A gap between rhetoric and performance?'. 'Normative Power Europe' in Egypt and Tunisia.
Clara della Valle (c.dellavalle@sssup.it)
AbstractThe explosion of the ‘Arab Spring’ in 2011 represented a strategic failure for the European Union (EU), by questioning its ‘Normative Power’ (I. Manners, 2002). Union’s ambivalence, always halfway between the rhetoric on democratic reforms and the coexistence with authoritarian regimes in North Africa was founded on the defence of a false stability, proved unsustainable by the uprisings. At the same time, the ‘Arab Spring’ prompted the EU to offer new responses to its southern neighbourhood, by giving it the opportunity to re-affirm its ‘Normative Power’. This paper aims to assess whether the EU was able to grasp this opportunity or not. Indeed, the question prompting this work is: ‘Is there a gap between European rhetoric and performance in terms of promotion of human rights and democracy?’ (R. Balfour, 2012). In other words, is the ‘Normative Power Europe’ theoretical model sustainable when it comes to empirical evidence? In order to address the issue, this paper conducts a comparison between one promising transition (Tunisia) and one failed transition (Egypt). Starting from a general overview of the ‘Normative Power’ theories – together with their critiques –, the paper tries to understand to what extent the EU has stressed the promotion of democracy and human rights towards Egypt and Tunisia within the frame of the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). Both the EU’s intentions and concrete actions towards these two countries are analysed through the analytical tool of Ian Manners’ indicators of norms’ diffusion (specifically, the informational, procedural, transference, and overt ones). The comparison shows that whether in Tunisia all the types of diffusion worked, this was not the case in Egypt, where only the informational and procedural ones were successful. Hence, the ‘Normative Power Europe’ theoretical model did not proved to be sustainable in the case of Egyptian transition, and a gap between the EU rhetoric and performance on human rights and democracy promotion emerged. The conclusions try to investigate the reasons behind this gap, by underlying how they do not simply depend on the classical dilemma normative/strategic interests within the EU and its Member States (MS), but they lie in a ‘grey zone’ including both internal and external elements to the Union. At the same time, the conclusions try to reflect on how to fill this gap, namely through the current ENP revision, that is analysed in a critical perspective.

Analysing EU normative action: the example of CSDP civilian missions
Azzurra Bassi (azzurra.bassi@gmail.com)
AbstractThe need to define a new Global Strategy on foreign and defence policy arose in a turbulent period of time for the European Union in terms of decline of its actor-ness, its way to respond to new global challenges and its capacity and instruments to implement coherent policies in these policy fields. One of the policy area of the forthcoming EU Global strategy is security and defence. Within the Common security and defence policy, the EU deploys military and civilian missions, among which the latter are more numerous than the first ones. This seems to confirm the EU's soft power nature and its willingness to active and constructively in the international arena. The notion of “EU soft power” is currently relevant and it would allow to the EU to make a tangible difference with a defined strategy and appropriate instruments. In this way, civilian CSDP missions can be a concrete example of the EU peculiar way to engage in crisis management. For this reason, this presentation has the aim to show the unique contribution of the European Union as a normative power, looking at some examples of civilian CSDP missions as empirical and practical case-study. After a general overview and description of civilian missions, the presentation will focus on the main problems and limits of these latter, but it also tries to point out possible suggestions and solutions to increase coherence and effectiveness of EU peace and state-building. Finally, civilian missions can provide a value added not only in the field of the security and defence policy, but also generally in the new EU strategy and for the wider EU external presence.

The role of for-profit actors in the implementation of EU targeted sanctions
Francesco Giumelli (f.giumelli@rug.nl)
AbstractThe EU has adopted a targeted sanctions approach in order to reduce the impact of sanctions on innocent civilians. However, financial transactions towards and coming from targeted countries have been proven to go much beyond the intention of the legislators. This is due to the hybrid form of security governance that is emerging in the European Union (EU). The role of private actors to intermediate public decisions has been investigated, but the evolving nature of the state in regulating also the security realm is recent and it deserves renewed attention. This article investigates the role of private actors in the implementation of EU targeted measures. By reviewing the ways in which the implementation of laws by private actors change the impact of the law itself, this article creates a typology of decisions that classify when firms and companies are more likely to change the ratio of decisions made by public authorities. The data for this research has been collected with semi-opened interviews and focus groups in Brussels held in April and November of 2013.

 

Panel 8.5 Assetti interni e competizione internazionale nello Spazio post-sovietico. A venticinque anni dalla dissoluzione dell’URSS (I)


È in corso una “nuova” Guerra fredda? La domanda circola incessantemente non solo negli ambienti diplomatico-militari e nel dibattito accademico, ma anche sui media, a causa dell’ampliarsi delle ragioni di attrito tra gli Stati Uniti e la Russia. Sebbene risulti evidente la contestazione di Mosca nei confronti dell’ordine internazionale scaturito dal triennio 1989-1991, il ricorso alle categorie del passato rischia di impedire l’effettiva comprensione degli attuali rapporti di potere. Il concetto di “nuova” Guerra fredda, infatti, pur cogliendo la realtà di un sistema unipolare “sfidato”, rischia di travisare sia l’essenza di quest’ultimo, che le reali intenzioni della leadership russa.
Anche senza ricorrere a una chiave interpretativa di tipo regionalista, sembra evidente che le dinamiche del sistema internazionale contemporaneo sono contraddistinte da attori, formule politiche e alleanze diversi di regione in regione: una tesi a riprova della quale interviene l’azione di Mosca, la cui contestazione del primato americano appare – per il momento – priva di ambizioni sistemiche e dettata dalle coordinate “classiche” della sua politica estera (senso di “missione”, percezione di accerchiamento, ricerca dello sbocco nei “mari caldi”, identificazione degli Stati confinanti come proxy delle grandi potenze avversarie). L’obiettivo del Cremlino, quindi, non sembra quello di puntare alla restaurazione del sistema bipolare, ma di evitare che il cosiddetto “estero vicino” si trasformi in un “estero condiviso”, se non in un vero e proprio “Occidente prossimo”. Sin dalla conferenza sulla sicurezza di Monaco del 2007, d’altronde, Vladimir Putin si è esplicitamente dichiarato favorevole al ritorno a un assetto multipolare – nella sua forma “minima” a tre poli (Stati Uniti, Russia e Cina) – considerata foriera di maggiore ordine.
La limitatezza del raggio della sfida di Mosca è definita dalla capacità di contagio esclusivamente “regionale” della formula del Russkiy Mir, che risulta speculare alla altrettanto circoscritta risposta politica del Cremlino alla proiezione globale di Washington. Quest’ultima, infatti, resta confinata ai soli teatri territorialmente o culturalmente contigui alla Federazione russa, come la cosiddetta “nuova Europa orientale” (Ucraina, Bielorussia e Moldova) e il Caucaso meridionale (Armenia, Azerbaigian e Georgia). Tali aree, rappresentando una sorta di diaframma geopolitico e istituzionale tra Occidente e Russia, sembrano destinate a costituire nei prossimi anni il terreno privilegiato per un rinnovato confronto tra modelli politici (democrazia liberale vs. democrazia sovrana), economici (economia di mercato vs. economia mista) e culturali (way of life occidentale vs. Russkiy Mir) che si stanno sempre più profilando come alternativi. Il principale elemento di continuità tra la competizione in atto e quella che ha caratterizzato il sistema bipolare, quindi, è la sua capacità di emergere sia nella sfera politica interna, prendendo forma nella definizione dei regimi e degli assetti di potere dei singoli Stati, che nell’ambiente internazionale, assumendo talvolta anche i contorni di un confronto militare indiretto.
A fronte dell’ampiezza dei temi coinvolti e della complessità che tradizionalmente contraddistingue i rapporti tra l’Occidente e la Russia, il panel ha scelto di adottare un approccio olistico. Intende ospitare sia lavori che indaghino gli assetti interni degli Stati post-sovietici, che quelli orientati allo studio dell’ambiente internazionale in cui sono collocati, tenendo ben presente la profonda interdipendenza interno/esterno.
Per una migliore organizzazione dei lavori, di conseguenza, il panel sarà organizzato in due sessioni:
i) una indirizzata agli studi comparatistici, che accoglie proposte di paper volte ad approfondire, in maniera disincantata e quanto più possibile fattuale, la realtà dei regimi politici instauratisi nello Spazio post-sovietico dopo il 1991. Una lente analitica preferenziale sarà quella dell’analisi della “geografia” delle élite in competizione per il potere nei singoli Stati, che costituisce un utile indicatore del più generale funzionamento dei rispettivi sistemi politici. Altrettanto interessanti, tuttavia, sono ritenuti gli approcci orientati allo studio del fenomeno della “patrimonializzazione” dello Stato e del gap che intercorre tra il sistema di potere formale e l’esercizio del potere sostanziale in numerosi Paesi dell’area, ma anche ad approfondire il livello di avanzamento dei processi di State-building,
ii) una dedicata agli studi internazionali, che ospita proposte di paper il cui oggetto di indagine è costituito dalle differenti dimensioni del confronto tra gli Stati Uniti e la Russia, all’interno del quale sono ricompresi anche il ruolo dei Paesi membri della Nato e degli Stati post-sovietici, nonché le possibili interferenze della Cina. L’attenzione viene accordata sia ai paper che analizzano le differenti dinamiche che si realizzano nella sfera dell’hard power (militare, diplomatica, economica), che a quelli che concentrano la loro attenzione sulle dinamiche relative alla sfera del soft power (formule politiche, forme di influenza, modelli di comunicazione).

Chairs: Marco Cilento, Gabriele Natalizia, Marco Valigi

Discussants: Gaspare Nevola

Da Silvio Berlusconi a Vladimir Putin. Variazioni sul concetto di
Marica Spalletta (m.spalletta@unilink.it), Lorenzo Ugolini (lorenzo.ugolini@uniroma1.it)
AbstractCome rimarcano autorevoli studiosi della comunicazione politica (Van Zoonen 2005; Mazzoleni, Sfardini 2009; Wheeler 2013), uno dei tratti distintivi della cosiddetta “pop politics” consiste nella sua tendenza ad appropriarsi di palcoscenici (televisione, cinema, musica, sport) diversi rispetto ai tradizionali “luoghi” della comunicazione politica. Tra questi palcoscenici, un ruolo di primo piano è certamente rappresentato dallo sport, il quale soddisfa entrambe le declinazioni che, secondo Van Zoonen (2005), contraddistinguono la popolarizzazione della politica: da una parte, l’uso di codici pop da parte dei politici (in questo caso la passione per uno sport, l’appartenenza a un tifo o l’identificazione con una squadra); dall’altro, l’apparizione di contenuti riconducibili alla politica all’interno di contesti e di codici pop (per esempio, un quotidiano sportivo). Con riferimento all’Italia, la massima espressione del connubio tra sport e politica è rappresentata da Silvio Berlusconi, la cui strategia comunicativa per vent’anni ha costantemente attinto ai codici pop dello sport (grazie al suo duplice ruolo di leader politico e di presidente di uno dei club più importanti e vincenti dello scenario calcistico italiano e internazionale), consentendogli così di conquistarsi spazi di notiziabilità (per esempio su «La Gazzetta dello Sport») normalmente esclusi a un soggetto politico (Spalletta, Ugolini 2015). L’obiettivo del paper è analizzare come il concetto di “sport politics” prende forma con riferimento a un altro caso paradigmatico di popolarizzazione della politica attraverso codici di natura sportiva: quello rappresentato da Vladimir Putin, la cui notiziabilità politica, negli ultimi anni, sovente ha preso forma anche nel frame del giornalismo sportivo (Spalletta, Ugolini 2013, 2016). Attraverso una media content analysis di tipo qualitativo (Altheide, Schneider 2013; Macnamara 2005), il paper analizza la copertura giornalistica che il principale quotidiano sportivo italiano, «La Gazzetta dello Sport», ha riservato al leader russo nell’arco temporale compreso tra il 1999 (anno nel quale assume la carica di primo ministro della Federazione Russa) e il 2014, anno in cui la notiziabilità sportiva di Putin raggiunge il proprio apice in coincidenza con la celebrazione dei Giochi Olimpici invernali di Sochi. Dalla ricerca emergono due diverse declinazioni che il concetto di “sport politics” assume applicato al caso Putin: da una parte, la passione per il judo diventa uno strumento utile per intessere/rafforzare relazioni con gli altri leader internazionali, al punto che si può parlare di una vera e propria “judo diplomacy”; dall’altra parte, lo sport costituisce un palcoscenico di visibilità per il leader russo, grazie alla sua significativa capacità di trasformare i media event sportivi in vere e proprie “incoronazioni” (Dayan, Katz 1992) in cui a uscire trionfatore non è l’atleta di turno bensì lo stesso Putin.

Choices of Russian Modernization
Mara Morini (mara.morini@unige.it)
AbstractPutin’s third presidential term was characterized by an impressive economic growth after a period of deep recession, dictatorial trends and an increasing confrontation with the West, following the annexation of Crimea. Authoritarian modernization is still at the core of the political and policy agenda in post-soviet Russia. Recent debate pays attention to how long and to what extent this agenda can dominate the country’s politics and in what direction it will be changed. Consequently, the paper aims to investigate the dubious and controversial nature of the very project of authoritarian modernization in Russia through the recent decisions of the country’s leaders taking into consideration both the rise of the electoral authoritarianism and its numerous challenges (domestic and international) which will affect its further trajectory.

L'identità nello spazio post-sovietico: il caso del Donbass.
Maurizio Vezzosi (mauriziovezzosi@gmail.com)
AbstractNell'intreccio post-sovietico di elementi economici, politici e culturali, quello dell'identità sociale risulta un importante problema nella Russia ieri pilastro dell'Urss, ed oggi di nuovo protagonista della scena internazionale: un problema figlio degli attriti tra il raffiorare delle tradizioni religiose, i molteplici nazionalismi, le nuove forme sociali del liberismo ed il retaggio sovietico. Nel quadro dello scontro geopolitico che si sviluppa a ridosso della faglia di instabilità che attraversa l'Europa, nelle autoproclamate Repubbliche Popolari della Novorossija di Lu'hansk e Donetsk della regione del Donbass si esemplifica il rifiuto sociale della demolizione dell'immaginario sovietico e del suo sistema di valori: un immaginario in parte assorbito dalla narrazione politica novorussa in loco, e “neorussa” più in generale. In un singolare gioco di luci e specchi, il processo di costruzione dell'identità novorussa poggia su riferimenti storici a volte in aperta contraddizione tra loro, come ad esempio quello religioso, e quello socialista-sovietico: di certo la riabilitazione di Stalin, figura la cui liceità è stata intermittente persino nel periodo sovietico assurge in modo assai efficace alla necessità identitaria dei (novo)russi, come la simbologia della Grande Guerra Patriottica, riscoperta in opposizione al riemergere dei movimenti neofascisti in molti paesi dell'ex Cortina di Ferro o della stessa Urss.

Quando è nata la Russia ‘post-sovietica’?
carolina de stefano (destefano.carolina@gmail.com)
AbstractSebbene la letteratura sulle ragioni del crollo dell’URSS sia molto vasta (tra gli altri Dallin 1992, Coen 2004, Zubok 2009), a distanza di 25 anni continua ad essere sottovalutato un aspetto cruciale: la dissoluzione del dicembre 1991 fu non solo un evento improvviso nelle sue fasi finali, ma anche l’ultima tappa, e la deriva, di un processo negoziale per un nuovo trattato sull’Unione avviato già alla fine del 1989 e durato due anni. I negoziati federali (soiuznyj dogovor), fortemente voluti da Gorbačev, portarono alla stesura di cinque diverse bozze di nuovo trattato e garantirono un continuo dialogo tra il centro sovietico, le Repubbliche socialiste e le altre entità territoriali fino alla fine. Se l’importanza di tali negoziati è stata già considerata in passato (Stankevič 2005), ad oggi non esistono sul tema lavori monografici in lingua inglese, e in russo si trovano rare analisi parziali, ma mai complessive. Con la finalità ultima di discutere le origini ed eredità istituzionali della Russia post-sovietica, nel presente paper si ipotizza che l’evoluzione politica di tali negoziati sia una delle variabili che, ben prima del crollo dell’URSS del 1991, hanno contribuito a riconfigurare le relazioni centro-periferia della Russia (incluse le relazioni Mosca-Estero Vicino) per come la conosciamo oggi (Ross 2003). Più precisamente, l’ipotesi è che nell’ambito di questi negoziati la competizione tra il Presidente dell’URSS Gorbačev e l’allora guida della RSFSR Boris El’cin (Dunlop 1995) sia uno degli elementi – tanto nella continuità quanto nella discontinuità con le strutture sovietiche – che hanno influenzato la riorganizzazione delle relazioni di potere centro-periferia della ‘nuova’ Russia. L’assunto metodologico di partenza è la visione della dissoluzione dell’Urss non come di un momento di netta cesura istituzionale, ma come un processo di disgregazione e ricostruzione di uno stato russo iniziato prima del 1991 e non ancora concluso (Kotkin 2008). Riguardo alle strutture federali, in particolare, questo appare evidente se si considera che a partire dal 1988/1989 in Unione Sovietica si assistette a una lotta per il potere e per la sopravvivenza politica che venne ammantata di retorica nazionale e nazionalista, ma che nei fatti permise a gran parte dell’elite sovietica di riconvertirsi in elite ‘democratica’ della nuova Russia tanto a livello locale, quanto federale (Drobiževa 1996, Kryštanovskaja 2003). L’approccio adottato è quello dell’historical institutionalism. In particolare, in questa sede viene accolta la teoria delle critical junctures (Capoccia, 2007), la quale rinoscosce in un momento di particolare crisi e criticità politica nazionale un effetto esponenziale e duraturo delle iniziative di singole personalità sull’evoluzione istituzionale successiva di uno Stato, guidata in seguito da una dinamica di path dependence. Coerentemente, la metodologia utilizzata è quella del narrative process tracing (Capoccia 2007), permesso in questo caso dallo studio e l’analisi di fonti primarie d’archivio in lingua russa. Le fonti sono per lo più inedite e ricostruiscono le principali tappe evolutive dei negoziati federali, oltre che, soprattutto, le opzioni di fronte alle quali si trovarono di volta in volta in quei mesi Gorbačev e El’cin in materia di relazioni tra il potere centrale e le élite locali. Le fonti di maggiore interesse provengono dal Fondo presso l’Archivio di Stato del Ministero per le questioni nazionali e regionali della Federazione Russa (1990-1994), dalla Fondazione Gorbačev a Mosca e dalla Fondazione El’cin a Ekaterinburg. La fase politico-istitutionale oggetto della presentazione costituisce il presupposto, e la premessa, tanto della decentralizzazione territoriale realizzatasi negli anni 1991-1994, quando del processo di ricentralizzazione dei poteri operata da Vladimir Putin già a partire dal suo primo mandato presidenziale e dalla gestione del secondo conflitto ceceno. L’analisi, nell’ambito dello stimolante panel organizzato dalla SISP, rappresenta un’occasione per valutare, discutere e riflettere su alcuni grandi questioni riguardanti lo stato dell’arte del processo di state-building russo oggi, a cui è impossibile dare risposte univoche. Tra le altre, la seguente: l’arrivo di Putin nel 2000 ha avviato una necessaria fase di riordino e riorganizzazione del sistema politico-giuridico russo o ha interrotto un processo che avrebbe trovato nel tempo, autonomamente, correttivi in senso maggiormente democratico?

 

Panel 8.5 Assetti interni e competizione internazionale nello Spazio post-sovietico. A venticinque anni dalla dissoluzione dell’URSS (II)


È in corso una “nuova” Guerra fredda? La domanda circola incessantemente non solo negli ambienti diplomatico-militari e nel dibattito accademico, ma anche sui media, a causa dell’ampliarsi delle ragioni di attrito tra gli Stati Uniti e la Russia. Sebbene risulti evidente la contestazione di Mosca nei confronti dell’ordine internazionale scaturito dal triennio 1989-1991, il ricorso alle categorie del passato rischia di impedire l’effettiva comprensione degli attuali rapporti di potere. Il concetto di “nuova” Guerra fredda, infatti, pur cogliendo la realtà di un sistema unipolare “sfidato”, rischia di travisare sia l’essenza di quest’ultimo, che le reali intenzioni della leadership russa.
Anche senza ricorrere a una chiave interpretativa di tipo regionalista, sembra evidente che le dinamiche del sistema internazionale contemporaneo sono contraddistinte da attori, formule politiche e alleanze diversi di regione in regione: una tesi a riprova della quale interviene l’azione di Mosca, la cui contestazione del primato americano appare – per il momento – priva di ambizioni sistemiche e dettata dalle coordinate “classiche” della sua politica estera (senso di “missione”, percezione di accerchiamento, ricerca dello sbocco nei “mari caldi”, identificazione degli Stati confinanti come proxy delle grandi potenze avversarie). L’obiettivo del Cremlino, quindi, non sembra quello di puntare alla restaurazione del sistema bipolare, ma di evitare che il cosiddetto “estero vicino” si trasformi in un “estero condiviso”, se non in un vero e proprio “Occidente prossimo”. Sin dalla conferenza sulla sicurezza di Monaco del 2007, d’altronde, Vladimir Putin si è esplicitamente dichiarato favorevole al ritorno a un assetto multipolare – nella sua forma “minima” a tre poli (Stati Uniti, Russia e Cina) – considerata foriera di maggiore ordine.
La limitatezza del raggio della sfida di Mosca è definita dalla capacità di contagio esclusivamente “regionale” della formula del Russkiy Mir, che risulta speculare alla altrettanto circoscritta risposta politica del Cremlino alla proiezione globale di Washington. Quest’ultima, infatti, resta confinata ai soli teatri territorialmente o culturalmente contigui alla Federazione russa, come la cosiddetta “nuova Europa orientale” (Ucraina, Bielorussia e Moldova) e il Caucaso meridionale (Armenia, Azerbaigian e Georgia). Tali aree, rappresentando una sorta di diaframma geopolitico e istituzionale tra Occidente e Russia, sembrano destinate a costituire nei prossimi anni il terreno privilegiato per un rinnovato confronto tra modelli politici (democrazia liberale vs. democrazia sovrana), economici (economia di mercato vs. economia mista) e culturali (way of life occidentale vs. Russkiy Mir) che si stanno sempre più profilando come alternativi. Il principale elemento di continuità tra la competizione in atto e quella che ha caratterizzato il sistema bipolare, quindi, è la sua capacità di emergere sia nella sfera politica interna, prendendo forma nella definizione dei regimi e degli assetti di potere dei singoli Stati, che nell’ambiente internazionale, assumendo talvolta anche i contorni di un confronto militare indiretto.
A fronte dell’ampiezza dei temi coinvolti e della complessità che tradizionalmente contraddistingue i rapporti tra l’Occidente e la Russia, il panel ha scelto di adottare un approccio olistico. Intende ospitare sia lavori che indaghino gli assetti interni degli Stati post-sovietici, che quelli orientati allo studio dell’ambiente internazionale in cui sono collocati, tenendo ben presente la profonda interdipendenza interno/esterno.
Per una migliore organizzazione dei lavori, di conseguenza, il panel sarà organizzato in due sessioni:
i) una indirizzata agli studi comparatistici, che accoglie proposte di paper volte ad approfondire, in maniera disincantata e quanto più possibile fattuale, la realtà dei regimi politici instauratisi nello Spazio post-sovietico dopo il 1991. Una lente analitica preferenziale sarà quella dell’analisi della “geografia” delle élite in competizione per il potere nei singoli Stati, che costituisce un utile indicatore del più generale funzionamento dei rispettivi sistemi politici. Altrettanto interessanti, tuttavia, sono ritenuti gli approcci orientati allo studio del fenomeno della “patrimonializzazione” dello Stato e del gap che intercorre tra il sistema di potere formale e l’esercizio del potere sostanziale in numerosi Paesi dell’area, ma anche ad approfondire il livello di avanzamento dei processi di State-building,
ii) una dedicata agli studi internazionali, che ospita proposte di paper il cui oggetto di indagine è costituito dalle differenti dimensioni del confronto tra gli Stati Uniti e la Russia, all’interno del quale sono ricompresi anche il ruolo dei Paesi membri della Nato e degli Stati post-sovietici, nonché le possibili interferenze della Cina. L’attenzione viene accordata sia ai paper che analizzano le differenti dinamiche che si realizzano nella sfera dell’hard power (militare, diplomatica, economica), che a quelli che concentrano la loro attenzione sulle dinamiche relative alla sfera del soft power (formule politiche, forme di influenza, modelli di comunicazione).

Chairs: Marco Cilento, Gabriele Natalizia, Marco Valigi

Discussants: Paolo Calzini

Vinca “il migliore”? L’influenza di Russia, UE e Turchia nel Caucaso meridionale
Enrico Fassi (enrico.fassi@unicatt.it), Antonio Zotti (antonio.zotti@unicatt.it), Carlo Frappi (carlo.frappi@gmail.com)
AbstractNell’attuale confronto tra l’Occidente e Russia, il Caucaso meridionale rappresenta uno snodo centrale e per certi versi paradigmatico: tanto la competizione politica e strategica, quanto quella economica e normativa in atto in questa regione evidenziano la contrapposizione tra modelli che paiono sempre più antitetici. Tali sviluppi appaiono ancora più evidenti se si focalizza l’attenzione sull’attore che maggiormente si è fatto portatore della proposta normativa di stampo occidentale nell’area, ossia l’Unione Europea. L’efficacia della proiezione dell’UE verso il Caucaso sembra infatti dipendere da diversi fattori, tra cui: il contenuto delle sue politiche, le caratteristiche specifiche della regione (come la prevalenza di conflitti “congelati” o le asimmetrie interne), la presenza di proposte politiche-economiche-normative alternative. In tale prospettiva, il paper si propone di analizzare la competizione normativa che tanto la Russia quanto la Turchia vanno determinando rispetto all'Ue nel Vicinato al fine di comprendere in che misura la rinnovata competizione (multi)regionale turco-russa ricada sulla politica europea verso il Caucaso meridionale.

Il pivot in Asia della Russia: tra percezioni e realtà
Daniele Fattibene (d.fattibene@iai.it)
AbstractIl paper si concentra sul re-indirizzamento verso Est della politica estera della Russia, a seguito del deterioramento delle relazioni con l’Occidente dopo la crisi in Ucraina orientale. Nello specifico l’elaborato andrà ad analizzare la politica estera del Cremlino verso la “nuova Europa Orientale” e le Repubbliche dello spazio post-sovietico. Questi temi saranno osservati da una prospettiva nuova, ossia quella dei rapporti sino-russi e della competizione internazionale tra Mosca e Pechino per l’egemonia in Eurasia. La relazione tra Russia e Cina sarà studiata soprattutto in riferimento a dinamiche in corso nella sfera dell’hard power (militare, diplomatica, economica), e al tentativo russo di trovare nel “pivot in Asia” uno dei pilastri di una nuova forma di multipolarismo di cui Mosca e Pechino sarebbero parte, in alternativa all’unipolarismo americano. La guerra in Ucraina, il progressivo deterioramento delle relazioni diplomatiche con Washington e Bruxelles e gli effetti politici ed economici provocati dalla politica sanzionatoria hanno accelerato un progressivo riavvicinamento strategico russo verso la Cina. Negli ultimi anni, Pechino e Mosca hanno rafforzato sempre di più la loro partnership sia da un punto di vista economico che militare. L’interscambio commerciale tra i due Paesi continua a crescere e potrebbe essere rafforzato ulteriormente dalla decisione di Putin e Xi Jinping di stipulare un accordo di libero scambio tra l’Unione Economica Euroasiatica (UEE) e la “Nuova Via della Seta”. Da un punto di vista militare i due Stati hanno inoltre rafforzato la loro relazione sia attraverso delle esercitazioni militari congiunte, sia ovviamente con notevoli acquisizioni di sistemi d’arma russi da parte della Cina. Questi eventi hanno alimentato in Russia la percezione che il “pivot in Asia”, unito alla ormai inevitabile fine dell’unipolarismo americano a vantaggio di un nuovo “multilateralismo delle grandi potenze” sia funzionale alla creazione di un nuovo terzo polo nel “disordine mondiale”: una grande Asia da Shanghai a San Pietroburgo. Il “pivot in Asia” della Russia pone tuttavia importanti domande sulla natura, le implicazioni e la sostenibilità di questo progetto. Questa politica si sta sviluppando su tre direzioni principali: il consolidamento dell’UEE nella “Nuova Europa Orientale”, lo sviluppo del passaggio a Nord-Est nell’Artico ed il mantenimento di una forte influenza sulle Repubbliche post-sovietiche in Asia centrale. Secondo la propaganda ufficiale, il riavvicinamento con la Cina sarebbe assolutamente compatibile conqueste tre direzioni. In primo luogo, la “Nuova Via della Seta” non è vista come un progetto alternativo bensì compatibile con l’UEE, in quanto volta allo sviluppo economico e infrastrutturale di tutta l’Eurasia. In secondo luogo, lo sviluppo del passaggio a Nord-Est, reso più accessibile dal surriscaldamento climatico, dovrebbe portare ad un re-indirizzamento delle rotte delle navi cargo dal Pacifico all’Artico, fornendo una via più rapida e sicura per i prodotti cinesi destinati ai mercati occidentali. Infine Mosca e Pechino hanno accordato una sorta di “divisione del lavoro” in Asia centrale, con la Russia impegnata a garantire la “hard security”, attraverso la Organizzazione del Trattato di Sicurezza Collettiva (CSTO), e Pechino responsabile invece dello sviluppo economico delle Repubbliche ex-Sovietiche. La propaganda russa dipinge le iniziative sino-russe come progetti complementari e non considera la Cina una minaccia per il mantenimento dello “status quo” nella regione. Ad una lettura attenta la visione del “pivot in Asia” della politica estera russa appare però molto più problematica di quanto sembri. In primo luogo, la presunta complementarietà dell’UEE e della “Nuova Via della Seta” appare quantomeno discutibile. I due progetti poggiano su due logiche completamente diverse (mercantilismo da parte di Mosca e libero scambio per Pechino). Inoltre l’UEE appare molto meno allettante della “Nuova Via della Seta” tanto per i vecchi quanto per i nuovi possibili membri. Ciò è dovuto principalmente al fatto che la Russia utilizza l’Unione non solo come strumento economico, ma come mezzo di pressione politica. Al contrario, le promesse di ingenti investimenti infrastrutturali legati all’adesione alla “Nuova via della Seta” appaiano molto più allettanti per i Paesi Euro-asiatici. In seconda battuta la rivalità sino-russa rischia di acuirsi anche in Asia centrale, che sta progressivamente trasformandosi in un forte terreno di scontro non solo politico ed economico, ma anche militare. Nonostante la presunta “divisione del lavoro” di cui sopra, nell’area lo strapotere economico di Pechino, unito alle naturali crescenti ambizioni militari cinesi potrebbero mettere in discussione lo “status quo” e oscurare il ruolo di Mosca. La forte recessione economica della Russia rende inoltre ancora più complesso per il Cremlino mantenere un’egemonia nell’area, anche dal punto di vista energetico, dove la Cina è fortemente interessata a investire in modo ingente per accaparrarsi le risorse energetiche regionali di cui ha estremo bisogno per soddisfare il suo fabbisogno interno. Non a caso Pechino è gradualmente diventato il principale partner commerciale di quasi tutte le Repubbliche post-sovietiche in Asia centrale, la cui stabilizzazione è importante per la Cina anche per ridurre le tensioni sociali nella vicina regione occidentale dello Xinjiang. Le lusinghe economiche cinesi potrebbero quindi tradursi in un crescente peso politico e militare. La Cina sta rafforzando le sue partnership strategiche con numerosi Paesi dell’area attraverso una serie di contratti di procurement militare, tramite l’espansione della Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), in cui l’ingresso di India e Pakistan potrebbe ulteriormente ridurre il ruolo finora predominante del Cremlino, e infine attraverso crescenti esercitazioni militari. A fare da contraltare a questa politica c’è poi il tentativo russo di giocare un ruolo maggiore nelle relazioni con alcuni Paesi importanti dell’area del sud est asiatico, in primis il Vietnam. Infine, l’idea che la Cina scelga il “passaggio a Nord-est” come una via commerciale alternativa a quella Pacifica appare molto opinabile. In primo luogo, esso rischia di entrare in rotta di collisione con la “Nuova Via della Seta”, il cui sviluppo dovrebbe consentire di ridurre drasticamente i tempi di percorrenza e consegna delle merci dal Pacifico ai mercati occidentali. Appare quindi difficile che Pechino possa investire importanti risorse per una rotta che, viste anche le avverse condizioni climatiche, appare meno sicura rispetto a quelle tradizionali. In secondo luogo dietro le quinte permane una forte disputa legale circa i diritti di transito nella regione artica. Mentre Pechino le ritiene acque internazionali, Mosca le considera acque territoriali e di conseguenza esige che sia versato un pedaggio da tutti coloro che le attraversano. Infine le crescenti attività militari della Cina nell’Artico hanno già provocato malumori nel Cremlino che ritiene la regione vitale per la sua sicurezza nazionale. Per tutti questi motivi, appare difficile che un riavvicinamento tra Russia e Cina possa essere favorito dallo sviluppo di questa rotta commerciale. In conclusione, il paper si prefigge di analizzare i tre elementi chiave della politica del “pivot in Asia” della Russia, inclusi i motivi spingono Mosca in questa direzione, offrendo un’interpretazione critica del riavvicinamento tra Mosca e Pechino, con lo scopo di mostrare come la retorica e i proclami del Cremlino al momento appiano lontani dall’avere una realizzazione concreta.

Prospettive ed evoluzione dei rapporti tra Russia e Unione europea
Alessandro Figus (figus@mail.md), Diana Spulber (diana.spulber@unige.it)
AbstractDopo i tragici eventi di terrorismo in Europa, vi è sul tavolo la questione se l'Unione europea voglia o no essere un attore politico internazionale serio e qualificato in un mondo in rapido cambiamento. In questo contesto diventa centrale il rapporto tra la Federazione Russa e l'UE-28. Il contributo vuole approfondire la conoscenza sull’evoluzione dei rapporti tra Russia e UE e le possibili prospettive, fondamentale sia per una questione di vicinato, sia per la complessità della sua visione globalizzata. Dopo il crollo dell'Unione Sovietica e l’adesione all’UE di molti stati che erano sotto la sua influenza, nulla può essere come prima, ma tutto va visto sotto nuove forme di interazione e cooperazione, analizzeremo anche questo aspetto.

Case study from the South Caucasus: Balancing or Bandwagoning?
Elmar Mustafayev (elmar.mustafayev@gmail.com)
AbstractThe South Caucasus (Transcaucasia) is a region located between Black and Caspian Seas and plays a natural bridge role between Europe and Central Asia; Russia and the Middle East. Despite its relatively small size and population, it has been considered as one of the most complex and militarized regions in the world. Also the South Caucasus for centuries has been witnessing a scramble of other powerful states in the region such as Russia, Turkey, and Iran. It is almost impossible to find a similar case where all regional countries - Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia - have been involved in conflicts (Abkhazia and South Ossetia conflicts between Georgia and Russia, Nagorno-Karabakh conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan), which undermines regional stability and security. Frozen conflicts and increasing security concerns compel regional states to seek for alternative and credible external alliances. Regarding its important geopolitical location and rich hydrocarbon resources, these countries also have been fallen under the notice of great and regional powers and have been pushed for alignment with these powerful states. All these factors have played decisive role in alignment choice of these states. While Armenia is a member of Russia-led Eurasian Economic Union and Collective Security Treaty Organization and hosts Russian military base on its soil, Georgia actively seeks membership from NATO and signed Association Agreement with EU. Unlike Armenia and Georgia, Azerbaijan has been pursuing balanced, interest based policy which satisfies the needs of powerful actors, a Modus Vivendi policy with regional actors and those beyond the South Caucasus. But war in Syria (Russia-Turkey tension after the jet incident) and “four-day war” between Armenia and Azerbaijan along the line of contact have caused some slight changes in foreign policy of Azerbaijan. Despite the efforts to maintain balanced foreign policy, Azerbaijan’s long term nonalignment policy has inclined towards Turkey. In my paper I’m intended to analyze foreign policy of the South Caucasus states by applying methodologies of alignment by S. Walt and try to find out answers to following questions: • What are the threats for countries of the South Caucasus that make them to seek for potential allies? • What are the benefits of great or regional powers from the alignment with these states? • And despite differences in foreign policy of these states and protracted conflicts what are the perspectives of regional integration in the South Caucasus?

 
 
© 2016 Società italiana Scienza Poltica   Convegno 2016 - Università Statale di Milano, Milano 15-16-17 settembre 2016 - segreteria@sisp.it     powered by